He has done things the old-fashioned way: asking friends to set him up, asking colleagues out and striking up conversations with strangers in bars.

He is still single and looking - but mostly at his mobile phone.

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Singles in Singapore are looking for friendship and love on dating apps, which are mobile-based and usually free.

All it takes is for you to download an app on your smartphone and connect via your Facebook account to start your hand-held quest for romance. I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you’re shy about making the first move in real life.

According to the report on General Household Survey 2015 released by the Department of Statistics early last month, the proportion of singles among residents aged 25 to 29 years rose from 74.6 per cent to 80.2 per cent for males and from 54 per cent to 63 per cent for females, between 20.

Ms Shn Juay, regional marketing director of Singapore-based dating app, Paktor, says one reason for the boom in dating apps is that "millennials like things to be quick, easy and convenient".

Others cite the security concerns that come with meeting a stranger off an app.

New app developers, notably led by women, have kept these issues in mind when creating niche apps that move away from Tinder's cast- your-net-wide style, hook-up- friendly model.

"I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you're shy about making the first move in real life." Paktor may have impressive user numbers, but Mr Chua Joo Hock, managing director of Vertex Ventures, a global venture capital platform which has invested up to US.5 million (S.1 million) in the dating app, estimates that Singapore is three to five years behind the United States, which is at the forefront of online dating, in terms of online dating social acceptability.

Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US

New app developers, notably led by women, have kept these issues in mind when creating niche apps that move away from Tinder's cast- your-net-wide style, hook-up- friendly model."I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you're shy about making the first move in real life." Paktor may have impressive user numbers, but Mr Chua Joo Hock, managing director of Vertex Ventures, a global venture capital platform which has invested up to US$10.5 million (S$14.1 million) in the dating app, estimates that Singapore is three to five years behind the United States, which is at the forefront of online dating, in terms of online dating social acceptability.Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US$1 billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.IT technician Leonard Whang, 28, who, like many of his peers, uses dating apps such as Tinder and Paktor, says the apps help people overcome the fear of rejection that comes with asking someone out face to face.He says: "When using an app, you don't know if someone has swiped left on your profile, you find out only about the positive matches.Singapore-based app Lunch Click, which is owned by the group behind home-grown match-making agency Lunch Actually, works on a similar premise, sending only one match to users daily. Ms Violet Lim, who is chief executive of Lunch Click, says chatting can often be a "dampener" in the mobile-dating experience.

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New app developers, notably led by women, have kept these issues in mind when creating niche apps that move away from Tinder's cast- your-net-wide style, hook-up- friendly model.

"I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you're shy about making the first move in real life." Paktor may have impressive user numbers, but Mr Chua Joo Hock, managing director of Vertex Ventures, a global venture capital platform which has invested up to US$10.5 million (S$14.1 million) in the dating app, estimates that Singapore is three to five years behind the United States, which is at the forefront of online dating, in terms of online dating social acceptability.

Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US$1 billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.

IT technician Leonard Whang, 28, who, like many of his peers, uses dating apps such as Tinder and Paktor, says the apps help people overcome the fear of rejection that comes with asking someone out face to face.

He says: "When using an app, you don't know if someone has swiped left on your profile, you find out only about the positive matches.

Singapore-based app Lunch Click, which is owned by the group behind home-grown match-making agency Lunch Actually, works on a similar premise, sending only one match to users daily. Ms Violet Lim, who is chief executive of Lunch Click, says chatting can often be a "dampener" in the mobile-dating experience.

||

New app developers, notably led by women, have kept these issues in mind when creating niche apps that move away from Tinder's cast- your-net-wide style, hook-up- friendly model.

"I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you're shy about making the first move in real life." Paktor may have impressive user numbers, but Mr Chua Joo Hock, managing director of Vertex Ventures, a global venture capital platform which has invested up to US$10.5 million (S$14.1 million) in the dating app, estimates that Singapore is three to five years behind the United States, which is at the forefront of online dating, in terms of online dating social acceptability.

Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US$1 billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.

IT technician Leonard Whang, 28, who, like many of his peers, uses dating apps such as Tinder and Paktor, says the apps help people overcome the fear of rejection that comes with asking someone out face to face.

billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.

IT technician Leonard Whang, 28, who, like many of his peers, uses dating apps such as Tinder and Paktor, says the apps help people overcome the fear of rejection that comes with asking someone out face to face.