Texting while driving, also called texting and driving, is the act of composing, sending, reading text messages, email, or making similar use of the web on a mobile phone while operating a motor vehicle.

Texting while driving is considered extremely dangerous by many people, including authorities, and in some places have either been outlawed or restricted.

This increase could be attributed to drivers over the age of 30 sending text messages.

More than 35% of New Jersey drivers aged 30 to 45 and 17% of drivers over 45 admitted to having sent a text message while driving in the last year, an increase of 5–10% from 2008.

The study, carried out at the Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport in Oscoda, Michigan, used two drivers in real cars and measured reaction times to the onset of light on the windshield.

The study compared the reaction times and distances of the subjects while reading a text message, replying to the text message, and impaired.

In November 2014, Sawyer et al., from the University of Central Florida and the US Air Force Research Laboratory, published the results of comparative study in a driving simulator.

Subjects were asked to use either Google Glass or a smartphone-based messaging interface and were then interrupted with an emergency event.

Driver's reaction times decreased by 46% while making a call, 37% when texting and driving, and 27% during hands-free calls.

Those who were drinking and driving at the limit of 80 mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood, reaction times slowed by 13% and 21% for those under the influence of cannabis.

The scientific literature on the dangers of driving while sending a text message from a mobile phone, or driving while texting, is limited but growing.

A simulation study at the Monash University Accident Research Center provided strong evidence that retrieving and, in particular, sending text messages has a detrimental effect on a number of safety-critical driving measures.

A 2010 experiment with Car and Driver magazine editor Eddie Alterman, which took place at a deserted air strip, showed that texting while driving had a worse impact on safety than driving while intoxicated.